County Histories: School Records

Samuel C. Dimick’s biographical sketch mentioned that “after attending the district schools of Lyme, [he] entered the high school of Orford, N. H., where he completed his education.” I set out to learn more about the school in Orford and what that experience may have entailed.

I found a description of the school in a county-history-style book about Grafton County, New Hampshire. This entry describes it as a boarding school.

Hamilton Child, editor, Gazetteer of Grafton County, New Hampshire, 1709-1886 (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse Journal Company Printers, 1886), page 240 (page 1052 on digital copy); digital images, FamilySearch Books (https://books.familysearch.org).

I did some more digging around on the internet and came across a bit of ephemera someone had digitized and posted online. The image is of what looks like a flyer or pamphlet describing the rules of the school. (The image is a partial scan and part of it is blurry, but we can get the idea of the rules and regulations from this portion.)

“Academy Structure and Regulations,” Encountering History Along the Cross Rivendell Trail (rivendelltrailshistory.org : dowloaded August 2015).

To quote parts:

“Any person of good moral character may become a member of this Academy…

“Tuition will be required in advance…

“Every student is required to spend such portions of the day in study, recitations, religious and other exercises as may be designated by the Principal.

“Every student is required to be at his own room during study hours and to conduct himself at all times with propriety.

“Neatness is required of all, both in their own and in the rooms of the Academy.

“The use of profane or indecent language, insult, or abuse of others, card and dice playing, are strictly prohibited.”

I was unable to locate any individual school records that might include the registration, grades, classes, etc. that Samuel may have taken but this find at least gives me a bit of insight into the character and upbringing of S. C. Dimick.

1 thought on “County Histories: School Records

  1. I love a good find like the Oxford School! Reading the rules and classes outlined for students back then is really amazing.

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